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Honoring Two Political Pioneers

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Honoring A Generation of Fighters

Date: 
Wed, 2015-09-09
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Latinos and Vietnam

 

It has now been 45 years since the 1970 Chicano Moratorium against the War in Vietnam took place in East Los Angeles. The Chicano Moratorium protested the disproportionate number of young Mexican Americans war draftees and casualties. The fact of the matter is that despite young Mexicans Americans’ loyalty to their country they continued to lack access to the opportunities available to many young Americans.

 

One of the defining moments for the Chicano Moratorium was the research on the war’s casualty reports by political scientist Rafael Guzman, a professor at Cal State Los Angeles. and UC Santa Cruz. The findings released in 1969 revealed that although Latinos and Chicanos made up 11 percent of the population in the Southwest, Latinos and Chicanos represented 19.4 percent of deaths.

 

The Chicano Moratorium became an important moment in history to many Chicanos and Latinos today. It has become a symbol of the struggles that we continue to face in our communities and lives. Nonetheless, Chicanos and Latinos who served in Vietnam—as well as, many of wars from the past and present—deserve our respect and recognition for their service and sacrifice.
 
After commemorating the Chicano Moratorium this past week, we would like to honor and remember Latinos and Chicanos who served and gave their lives in the Vietnam War and the many other wars of this country.
 
Please join us in a week of celebration of our Chicano and Latino Veterans by submitting your photos of friends or family who served in the Vietnam War for a chance to be featured in LA Plaza’s Presentation proceeding On Two Fronts: Latinos in Vietnam.  
 
This blog entry was contributed by LA Plaza's newest volunteer, Margarita. Margarita discovered La Plaza last summer while visiting La Placita Olvera and made it a goal to volunteer for the museum. As a volunteer she has supported various staff on starting social media and educational projects.