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¡Raza Si, Guerra No!

Date: 
Wed, 2015-08-26
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Remembering the Chicano Moratorium

 

The Chicano Moratorium was organized by the National Chicano Moratorium Committee. It is estimated that about 20, 000 to 30, 000 Mexican and Mexican American families, students, activist and allies of various ethnic and racial backgrounds joined the procession and raised their left fists in the air to demonstrate their solidarity with the movement. This day meant more than just a march to the Chicano Moratorium Committee and other Chicano activist present. The march embodied the goal of the Chicano Movement which was "La Raza Unida" or unity of the people. Everyone present had a common goal and purpose: to denounce the war in Vietnam and the ongoing injustice at home.

 

Chicanos were being drafted to Vietnam by the thousands and many did not make it back home. The Chicano did not belong fighting foreign wars, thought Chicana/o activists of the time. They were needed at home to fight the wars of their communities against police brutality, unequal education, poverty and other ongoing social issues. Rosalio Munoz, co-chair of the Chicano Moratorium committee, felt a sense of satisfaction to see the thousands upon thousands of Chicana/os and Mexican American people marching with him. This was a reflection of the level consciousness within the people. Therefore, La Raza had always been conscious and all they needed was a few dedicated people to organize them.
 
 
Although this day ended in a violent riot, 45 years later the Chicano Moratorium is still remembered. Through the efforts of the National Chicano Moratorium Committee (NCMC) and supporters, a commemoration of the Chicano Moratorium march has been done since 1990 to make the community aware of present day acts of social injustice in Chicana/o Latina/o communities.
 

To learn more about the Chicano Moratorium and its legacy click here

 

WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS?
 
What do you think is the legacy of the Chicano Moratorium for your community?
 
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This blog entry was contributed by LA Plaza's newest volunteer, Margarita.

 

Margarita discovered La Plaza last summer while visiting La Placita Olvera and made it a goal to volunteer for the museum. As a volunteer she has supported various staff on starting social media and educational projects.