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Honoring Two Political Pioneers

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Rosalio Munoz

Date: 
Sat, 2015-08-29
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At first, Rosalio did not seem like a likely candidate to become part of the Chicano Movement. He had grown up in Highland Park during the times when it was predominately populated by white Americans. In fact, Rosalio did not have any Mexican American friends, but Italian and Anglo. His mother was sixth-generation Mexican American and his father was the first Mexican American to obtain a Ph.D in his family.

 
What changed for Rosalio? 
 
After leaving for Mexico with his family and staying for a year, Rosalio Munoz returned with a renewed spirit and stronger sense of identity as a Chicano. He rapidly became involved in his community. First, he became class president at Benjamin Franklin High School, later he was elected the first Chicano student body president at UCLA and he served as Co-Chair of the Chicano Moratorium Committee. As Co-Chair, he gave the welcoming speech during the rally at Laguna Park.
 
Rosalio invested himself in the community and helped young Chicanos who wanted to seek deferment or resist the Vietnam War Draft. On September 16, 1970, he was called to serve but refused to leave. To this present day, Munoz is still active within the Chicano/a and Latino/a community. He seeks to educate others and has been involved in community-based organizations, such as the Instituto del Pueblo and Young Theatreworks. 
 
To learn more about his activism and involvement in Chicano Civil Rights movement watch KCET Departures.
 
WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS?
Are there leaders and /or organizations initiating social change in your community today?
 
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This blog entry was contributed by LA Plaza's newest volunteer, Margarita.
 
Margarita discovered La Plaza last summer while visiting La Placita Olvera and made it a goal to volunteer for the museum. As a volunteer she has supported various staff on starting social media and educational projects.