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¡YA BASTA!

Date: 
Fri, 2015-08-28
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CHICANO MORATORIUM 8,000 Dead YA BASTA! L.A. Aug 29.

 

Ruben Salazar's body lay lifeless inside the Silver Dollar Bar and Cafe after a tear-gas canoster was fired inside the bar. The homicide detectives noticed Salazar wearing a pin with the insignia, "CHICANO MORATORIUM 8,000 Dead YA BASTA! L.A. Aug. 29," demonstrating his commitment to the Chicano Movement and march protesting the Vietnam War.

 

Today, Chicano/a activists, such as Rosalio Munoz, emphasize not only remembering Ruben Salazar's tragic death but also his life's work. Ruben Salazar is known to be the most revered Latino journalist of his time. As a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, he was given the task to cover the Chicano Movement in the late 1960's. His exposure to the movement made him a strong supporter of it and led him to write more extensively on the different aspects that made up the Chicano experience during the 1960s. Thereafter, Salazar also began to highlight injustices occurring within the Chicano/a community, such as police brutality and unequal practices.

 

Ruben was a stronger supporter of social justice and believed that through his writing and television coverage he could give a voice to the Mexican American community. His desire to write about the social injustices experienced during the late 60s and 70s should be remembered, especially among the new Chicano/a and Latino/a generations.

 

To learn more about Ruben Salazar life and death, as well as his growing support for the Chicano movement watch this PBS Episode Ruben Salazar: Man in the Middle.

 

This blog entry was contributed by LA Plaza's newest volunteer, Margarita.

 

Margarita discovered La Plaza last summer while visiting La Placita Olvera and made it a goal to volunteer for the museum. As a volunteer she has supported various staff on starting social media and educational projects.